Reception quay for grapes    



Since 1999, the vinification has taken place in the new winery built at the bottom of the Grands Crus. This new building has modernised both the reception and the pressing of the grapes and has doubled our capacity for vinification and storage.



The winery Press loading by gravity



Once picked, the grapes are elevated into the press which prevents premature crushing and the subsequent oxidation which may result in a certain loss of aroma in the juice. The grapes are then pneumatically pressed which allows a progressive flow of juice.



Clearing out tanks    
Before fermentation, the juice spends a short period in the settling tanks.



The different wines may then be placed, either in vats or oak barrels where they stay until they are blended.
    Vinification in barrels



Alcoholic fermentation starts a few days after harvesting and during this period is watched over very closely. The density and temperature is checked twice daily and fermentation may last for a few days to several weeks depending on the year.
    The domainís laboratory



This is followed by Malolactic fermentation which allows the wine to soften up and evolve.
The acidity in the wine is reduced by transforming malic acid to lactic acid. This fermentation is accompanied by secondary effects which enrich and add complexity to the wine.

 
Tasting prior to blending    
The wine making process lasts about ten months. For the Chablis and Petit Chablis, it is carried out entirely in vats. On the other hand The Premier and Grand Crus are partially vinified in barrels in our cellars. One of the differences of the Domain is that we were one of the first to come back to barrels in the 1980s.



After about 10 months, the different wines are tasted and blended. This is without doubt the most complicated part of the work at the Domaine but also the most interesting.

 


The wines are then fined and filtered and bottled by about September.
Marketing of the recently bottled wine then begins just before the following harvest.

 
    Bottles ready for marketing


Cellar storage